U.S. Policies

HIAS advocates for refugees in the U.S. by encouraging Congress and the Administration to uphold the United States’ proud tradition as a leader in refugee protection and assistance. Our goals are to ensure that the annual resettlement quota is fair, that the process is not overly burdensome to the refugees, and that Congress provides sufficient funding. HIAS Statement to the Office of Refugee Resettlement, U.S. State Department

 

RESETTLEMENT QUOTA

The Administration has capped the number at 70,000 annually for each of the last two years. This is half the number who were allowed into the country 20 years ago.  READ MORE

APPLICATION PROCESS

U.S. policies subject refugees to a lengthy, bureaucratic approval process. It can take three years or more for approval. Asylum seekers, those who come directly to the U.S. seeking protection, are immediately detained in prison-like facilities. These processes are unacceptable for a humanitarian program.  Sign our petition. READ MORE  

FEDERAL FUNDING

Providing a safe haven for refugees means providing short-term assistance to newly arrived refugees while they become self-sufficient. Congress should increase 2014 funding for the Office of Refugee Resettlement by $200 million. READ MORE

 

PROTECTING RELIGIOUS MINORITIES - LAUTENBERG AMENDMENT

HIAS resettled thousands of Jews from the Soviet Union in the 1990s, aided by the Lautenberg Amendment. Today, the Amendment allows us to assist other persecuted religious minorities from Iran and elsewhere. Congress should extend its provisions beyond the current deadline of September 30, 2014. READ MORE

LOCAL ADVOCACY - THE LINKING COMMUNITIES PROJECT

To combat anti-refugee sentiment, HIAS and partner refugee organizations created The Linking Communities Project to support innovative local initiatives that highlight the benefits of refugee resettlement. READ MORE